Definitions English

  • To have and keep in one's grasp: held the reins tightly.
  • To aim or direct; point: held a hose on the fire.
  • To keep from falling or moving; support: a nail too small to hold the mirror; hold the horse steady; papers that were held together with staples.
  • To sustain the pressure of: The old bridge can't hold much weight.
  • To keep from departing or getting away: Hold the bus! Hold the dog until I find the leash.
  • To keep in custody: held the suspect for questioning.
  • To retain (one's attention or interest): Televised sports can't hold my interest.
  • To avoid letting out or expelling: The swimmer held her breath while underwater.
  • To be filled by; contain.
  • To be capable of holding. See Synonyms at contain.
  • To have as a chief characteristic or quality: The film holds many surprises.
  • To have in store: Let's see what the future holds.
  • To have and maintain in one's possession: holds a great deal of property.
  • To have as a responsible position or a privilege: held the governorship for six years.
  • To have in recognition of achievement or superiority: holds the record for the one-mile race; holds the respect of her peers.
  • To maintain control over: Thieves held the stolen painting for ransom.
  • To maintain occupation of by force or coercion: Protesters held the embassy for a week.
  • To withstand the efforts or advance of (an opposing team, for example).
  • To maintain in a given condition, situation, or action: The storyteller held the crowd spellbound.
  • To impose control or restraint on; curb: She held her temper.
  • To stop the movement or progress of: Hold the presses!
  • To reserve or keep back from use: Please hold two tickets for us. Hold the relish on that hamburger.
  • To defer the immediate handling of: The receptionist held all calls during the meeting.
  • To be the legal possessor of.
  • To bind by a contract.